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The Leadercast Podcast
The Leadercast Podcast

Episode · 4 years ago

5: Give Yourself Permission to Change With Kat Cole

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Kat Cole didn’t have the easiest time growing up.

At a young age, her family had to leave her father, leaving them with little opportunity or resources.

Kat is now the COO and President at FOCUS Brands, North America.  She got to where she is in large part because of the behavior her mother modeled as they were growing up.  As a single mother she showed her family how to be resilient. On a meager income, they were able to survive on a food budget of $10 per week.

This upbringing taught Kat how to figure things out.  She never knew all of the answers, but she knew that if she kept searching, she could make the best out of any situation.  This led to Kat’s journey of continual self-improvement and modeling personal change in both her professional and private life.

In this episode of The Leadercast Podcast, we speak with Kat about her story and the importance of acting on personal and professional feedback.

This is the leader cast podcast, hoping you be a leader worth following. Hello and welcome to another episode of the leader cast podcast. I'm Natalie Toque, your host for today's episode and on behalf of our whole leader cast team. Thanks for tuning in. We've got a great episode in store for you today, featuring another outstanding leader, Cat Cole. Cat is the president and Celo of North America for focus brands, you know, those delicious restaurants you love, like Cinnabon, most sothwest girl, Auntie and's. Those are just a few of the brands that fall undercat's leadership. Outside of her day job, cat invests in and advises entrepreneurs and start up founders, and she is on the United Nations global entrepreneurs panel. On top of all of that, cat is a two time leadercast live speaker and she is a treasured and integral part of our leader cast community. Cat, thank you so much for joining the podcast today. We're so excited. Thank you for having me. It is our pleasure, of course, and I've had the privilege to chat with Kat a few times prior to this and cat, I always just learned so much from you and feel like your story and your wisdom is just kind of unmatched in this leadership space. So for our listeners, would you just share a little bit of your story and how you made your way to this season of influence in your life and career? Sure so, it's a little bit of a non traditional path, but I was born in Jacksonville, Florida and I'm the oldest of three girls. I have two younger sisters and when I was nine years old we left my father. So I am a child of a single parents. My father was an alcoholic and a good man, but a terrible husband and father at the time. And so at a very young aide I had to take on leadership responsibility, helping to care for my sister's helping my mom around the house. But I also witnessed my mother being an incredible leader, someone who, without many resources and not much by way of financial means or a network or community to lean on, she set our family on a food budget of ten dollars a week for three years. She had the courage to leave and go out on her own with us, despite not really having a lot of income or a lot of resources, and so I witnessed her courage and her decisionmaking and her resilience and as we grew up, I started working at an early age, so my work ethic is deeply rooted. I saw my mom working three jobs. became a hostess at a restaurant, at hooters restaurants, at the age of seventeen. At the age of eighteen, with the first person in my family to get into college, was an engineering major. Then, as hooters restaurants was growing and I was paying my way through college by working in the restaurants, I was offered the opportunity to become a new restaurant trainer and eventually start being a part of opening teams to go open restaurants around the world and at the age of nineteen, opened my first international franchise in Australia. I'd never been on a plane, I...

...didn't have a passport when they asked me to go, and so I bought my first plane ticket for to Miami's food in line and got a passport expedited in twenty four hours, even though I had already said Yes to the opportunity and from that point, even though I was still in college, opening that restaurant internationally opened up a new pass for my career I didn't realize it at the time. I thought it was a once in a lifetime opportunity. I came back, made up my classes that I missed after Australia and just thought I'd never get an opportunity like that again. And a few months later was asked to go open the franchise, first restaurant in Central America and then, several months later, in South America. And before I knew it I was traveling so much around the world that I was stailing college, and so I dropped out of college at the age of twenty with no promises, no contract. I was still an hourly employee, but I had this compelling alternative of opening restaurants around the world while still being a waitress and a line cook and a shift leader in my hometown restaurant in between these trips. And as luck would have it, the corporation needed someone to move to Atlanta to oversee the growing companies training department for Employee Training, and so I was offered the job. I took the job. I moved to Atlanta at the age of twenty and took my first corporate job and over the next several years I grew as the company grew was vice president of the company by Age Twenty Six, when we were doing about seven hundred and fifty eight hundred million in revenue. All along that way my life took interesting turns. I began a pass of humanitarian work, both locally, domestically and internationally and Eastern Africa. I invested in my time heavily and industry associations and women's organizations, and so there were many parallel pads to leadership, as I was an executive in this growing restaurant company, continuing to lead international business, training, development etc. Along the way I started speaking to different companies in large groups. So that evolved into a passion for public speaking, which I've done for quite some time, and then eventually got recruited into private equity. became the president of Cinnabon at the age of thirty one. So left tutors after fifteen years, continued my humanitarian work and then took on progressive roles as focused brands, the parent company of Cinnabon, continue to grow and today I'm Coolo and President North America of Focus Brands, which has the famous restaurant brands all around the world and over fifty countries, and it will continue my humanitarian work today and here we are. Holy Cow. Yeah, what a story and one of the things that I know our audience has loved most about you is that that story obviously is incredible and impactful and show so much about who you are, but also, I think people will be able to hear, even just in your voice and telling it, there's a humility to you, cat that is so just admirable and something that we all can learn from, which I really appreciate a lot as a fellow female leader in an organization. So I'm hearing through your story, obviously, this power of the power of Grit and the power of courage, and you mentioned that you saw a lot of that, all of that modeled in your mom through your childhood and still today. And tell me a little bit...

...about was there a specific moment that you felt like, I have what it takes to do this and I'm going to go after it now, or where there are people in your life that said you can go do this now, like the encouragement around you? I think it was a little bit of all of the above. I had a belief instilled in me because my mom was so resilient herself and so that's just what I observed, but then also very supportive that I could figure anything out. What that means is I didn't necessarily believe I had it all figured out, that I had what it took, but I believed I could find out whatever that was. And so I had a deep, deep rooted confidence, not that I had all the answers, but that I could ask the right questions. And so I found this pride and being curious. I didn't look at having to ask questions to learn something as failure or as being weak or as being not as good as other people. It was just an obvious step I needed to take in order to get a good job done. And so that's the confidence that I had. I had the confidence that I could figure it out, not that I could always do it, and then every time I would ask for help or took a risk, I seemed to be rewarded for it. which does not mean I didn't make mistakes. I made mistakes all the time, especially because I was so new at so many jobs. So often, you know, the the first time for all of us, for everything, and I had a lot of first in a short amount of time. New Country, these new teams, new job, inexperience processes an organizational structure at the growth that we were having, and so we were all figuring things out together and so very few things actually went smoothly. But I became comfortable with that. I became comfortable with being unknown and unpopular and being uncomfortable, and that reframed failure for me. And so it was this. You know that I love the refraining of the acronym sailed first attempt in learning, and so making mistakes to me was simply it was an obvious I'm of course I'm stubbing my toe because we're running really fast in on a trail that we've never been on. And that doesn't mean I can keep making those mistakes, but it's expected that I will learn and I'll be humble about that and I'll ask for help, but also be courageous and keep trying new things and respond to the feedback and coaching and criticism or lessons that I learn along the way. And I think the more you do that, the more you bring forward this combination of humility and curiosity on one side but courage and confidence on the other, and not over indexing on one or the other. It's this blend of those things on a perfect balance, but a blend really has allowed me to take risk, bring people along with me, ask for help and have that turn into a relatively positive outcome in pretty consistently unfamiliar circumstances. Yeah, absolutely. I think when I hear your story and think about, like you said, the number of first you had in such a condensed window, it kind of like strikes fear and me...

...like I think, oh my gosh, is that had happened to me? How would I have responded to all of those challenges, one right after the other? And so I think I wonder for other leaders who maybe not, haven't necessarily had to be as resilient as you did in your kind of early years and modeled from your mom, how can they develop that skill and that muscle of resilience and courage? Great Question. One of my favorite books is Antela Duckworth Grit, and she actually interviewed my mom and I for it after she heard my story and I thought it was so cool that my mom got to be interviewed and it's what she does. Talk about being in a situation and finding a way to take on more responsibility. So maybe if an individual hasn't had a tough situation. They've been in the same hometown for thirty years and they kind of know everyone and everyone knows them, or they've worked in the same industry or the same job, the same business for a number of years and feel very comfortable, or they are very popular. You know they haven't been in a situation where they've had to be uncomfortable or unpopular. I think one of the techniques which Angela profiles is taking on more responsibility. So when you're in a situation where you are known and you know the circumstances, one of the ways to become uncomfortable is to raise your hand to take on more responsibility, and that might mean a new project, it might mean leading a different team, it may mean volunteering in your industry. But that certainly, even though I grew up with an environment that forced some of my resilience, I also consciously chose to take on more responsibility in both my work and in my community, and that created more complexity in my life and required that I figure things out, from time management to New People, to working with teams that in especially in the volunteering world, in the nonprofit world. I'm not paying those teams they don't have to do a thing I say. But I had to learn to be a leader by being mission driven, by rallying people around the cause, and that was hard, was really hard work. It with limited resources, by the way, and so one way to build this resilience, even if you're in a position of privilege or comfort, is to take on more responsibility. The second way is to go put yourself in a position of no privilege and no comfort, and that's a bit more extreme, but I think it's required to build resilience. So that might mean reaching into your community to individuals who don't have the same resources. It might be an under resourced community, it might be working with a businessperson that is younger or a person of color or a veteran who is really trying to make their way but hasn't had access to the same comfort or resources you have. Go walk a day in their shoes, help them be successful, bring them into your world of comfort, see how you can mentor them and of course you're going to learn so much from them as well. And and even for me, even though I grew up in really tough situation, it still could have...

...been worse. You know, we didn't have to live in our car. We weren't homeless. It was tough, but it could always be worse. And so as I grew up and had more responsibility and more income and sort of stuff, you know that the job and the title and all the things that people from the outside say, wow, you live a great life. I still consciously make sure I am reaching back into communities of need, going to conflict zones in my work with the United Nations Global Entrepreneurs Council, with my own humanitarian work, because I know in order to make sure I stay grounded, I have to keep reaching into communities, not just to pay it forward, not just to reinvest, but to make sure my head stays rooted in what really matters and what tough and hard really looks like versus my world. So at those opportunities for those who don't feel there in tough situations. They exist all around us. So I'd say if you if you feel like you really never had to exercise your grit muscle, go to a situation where it requires that of you and do it often over time, because just because you've done it once ten years ago, you know it doesn't mean you still have that that gritty resilience and perspective. Today, I think the expectation sometimes, Oh, you have to go to this different country, when really it could be a mile down the road that there's people to have a totally different lifestyle and need than you that you can be a part of as well as a Leadya, that was interesting. I went back to school. I'm a college drop out, but I went back and got an MBA, so of a master's without a Bachelor's, and I did that at Georgia State University and their executive and be a program and so I really connect with companies and groups that give people a chance and have non traditional paths to achievement and as a result, I've stayed very close with Georgia state and the Robinson School of business and they reached out and asked me to be a part of their mentoring program for women students and I said absolutely, but I will only mentor a woman of color, because I believe in using access and opportunity to reach in and give that to someone who might not have access to it. And and I wanted to make sure it was someone who is on a full scholarship, who did not have the privilege of income because that's where I feel I need to shine my light the most and where I need to reach deepest to provide access to resources. And so it's still it's one little thing. But if you have privilege, and that doesn't mean you are the CEO or a president, it just means if you have time, if you have resources, if you have something you've learned that someone else can benefit from, don't forget to insist on diversity or on the fact that you want the people you're accessing to be those who are most in need, who would least likely on their own, have the ability to connect with you, and building that bridge somehow m definitely. So much of what I'm hearing from you in this conversation is the power of intentional decisionmaking as a leader and asking the right questions. So say you're on the outside of an organization looking in and you're observing a leader who doesn't reflect those qualities of self leadership, who is not making those intentional decisions.

What are some of the detriments to that organization because of those that leader's actions? I think one destriment that is both qualitative and quantitative in how it would be observed and measured, is the lack of authenticity. So if a leader is demonstrating a lack of leadership of self, whatever their words are that they are professing to the organization to step up, to have drive, to innovate, to execute, by definition are going to be incongruent with their behaviors. And if what you say is incongruent with how you show up and how you behave, it is predictable that the organization and people in it will not believe, will not be bought in culturally and therefore will not have that deeply bought in, deeply connected strategic intent. And so what I would expect to see qualitatively is a bit of a sort of low engagement rating and scoring of perception of culture. But what I would also expect to see financially is not effecient use of resources, not people who are driving ideas from within because they're not deeply believing that the leader is behaving, you know, walking the talk, if you will, behaving consistently with the way they're asking others to show up. On the flip side of that, though, is if you're a leader that had its then come to your attention that your self, leadership isn't where it needs to be. You know, we talked about this concept at leadercast live backstage, and you talked about it on stage that as a leader, you have to give yourself permission to change and to make yourself better, even if it's you know, and especially if it's been brought to your attention that there are areas to improve your leadership. So why is it important for leaders to give themselves that permission to change? Specifically? Yeah, I believe so much in this. There's so much power in that phrase, the permission to change. First is the word permission, you know, which is it's funny because on one hand you say you don't need my permission. You know I'm not the authority on the change and in your life. You know my permission. But there is something important about permission, about allowing yourself the moment to evolve, about not being beholden to your path. Another way I like to say it is don't let your roots be your anchor, you know, don't let your history be the thing that you feel you're defined by, but let your roots be your engine. And what that all means in terms of what something is brought to your attention that might be suboptimal or a description of a way you're leading that is to be addressed and improved. First there has to be this muscle, this learning muscle, this belief system around feedback and around being on a journey me and growing as a human and a leader that allows you to take that very seriously and not be crippled by it but rather say, okay, I'm hearing there's something that is not serving my leadership, while...

...it's not serving my team, it's not serving my business and at at worst or best, depending on the situation, it's suboptimal. So first there has to be a mindset around hearing it and believing it's just part of everyone's journey, so that that's what's necessary. But the reason it's important is one. We all need to grow, we all need to improve, but having the ability to hear that feedback, to act on it, to give yourself permission to change, to be vulnerable enough to share the growth opportunity with your team and then be courageous enough to act on it, is the type of behavior you want modeled in organization. Not only doesn't mean that leader is going to progressively get better, which means progressively adding value to the organization and providing more of an investment return. You know, they were making an investment in leaders and investment and human capital, and so every time any of us get better, that's a higher return on that investment. The company is making an us, but it's modeling behavior that shows everyone that is something that is both not only okay but expected, that you will continually be confronted with areas in which you can improve and be expected to acknowledge and then act. And what you hope that creates as a culture where not only action comes from being confronted with areas to improve, but that people start to pause and reflect on their own regularly and ask themselves, what can I do differently and better and and where do I look for those examples? I call it the hot shot rule of pretending someone who's amazing takes over your job tomorrow, or if your organizations going through a lot of change, and that's maybe a scary example to you, because it would make people sensitive and the think of the best version of themselves. If the best version of yourself showed up with one thing that you would do differently tomorrow, if it were your first day on the job, and how do you look at your job with fresh eyes and then take action. Just one thing that you can do better, that maybe you've been putting off or haven't had the same sense of urgency around that you would have if it were your first day, and you just do that regularly, monthly or quarterly. I like to do it monthly and then share it with people. Hey, here's something that, when I looked back and reflected, I really should have had the conversation with that person months ago, I really should have fired that person a year ago, I really should have hired that person months ago and and because I recognize that I haven't had the sense of urgency around it that I should have, I'm going to take action on it. And so one you're taking action, you're making the business better, you're making the team better, whatever the situation is, but you're also demonstrating openness, a growth inclination, vulnerability, a bias for action and a learning muscle that is inherent in the best of leaders and the best of teams. Totally and I love this conversation because so often the word change is turn around an organization and it instills fear or it has a negative connotation. And by the leader giving themselves for a and to change your inherently institutionalizing change as a regular, healthy construct in an organization instead of this big bad wolf at your front door. Yeah,...

...exactly. That's really cool. Do you feel like you've seen leaders? I know you've mentioned your mom, but do you feel like you've seen leaders who have modeled this really well and they've seen great success because of it? Absolutely, I mean I've seen both, you know. I've seen leaders that have modeled this incredibly well, who acknowledge something that couldn't should be done better, they change immediately. And then two things happen. One, when you finally do that thing that you realize you should have done, most people say, wow, what took you so long? You know, the funny thing is that the people in quotation marks, you know, the team or the employees, have kind of been waiting for you to make the tough call for a while because you're the leader and you're supposed to do that. You know, not then, maybe they've known what's going on, but they've just been waiting. And so I've found that leaders who have this muscle to reflect or to take feedback and to act on it and then share that transparently with their team often realize that, unlike what they expected, which is making the tough call, would actually worry people or freak them out. Quite the contrary. Was True that they've been waiting for them to make the call. They've known that this person needs to be addressed or that this opportunity needed to be explored, but they didn't have the authority to do it because they're not the leader, or they didn't have the language to fully articulate the problem where the solution. So that's what I've seen happen. Is More Times than not, people who are around the leaders say finally, and the leader goes wow, why didn't you tell me that before, and the answer was because you're the leader, so you're supposed to do it. So I find that the more leaders demonstrate this this transparency, this vulnerability and then this bias for action, they also realize they need to stay closer to their people, because their people realized for quite some time, long before they did, what this thing is that needed to be addressed. And in it will help leaders compress the amount of time between when the teams and those who are close to the customer know what the right thing to do is and when the leader does. And so it also trains this other muscle of staying close to the action, because you realize, wow, I not only did I realize the theory to opportune to improve in this opportunity by reflecting, but I don't need to meditate to figure it out right and I'm used to think close to my people and the answers will come to me more frequently and I'll be be able to use this muscle of bias for action to just keep acting on things that are important to the business. Yeah, absolutely. Do you have a regular schedule for checking up on this sort of thing with yourself and taking the time to reflect in your own life and in your own role at focus prints? I do. I do a little mini version, probably. I mean it's become such a muscle for me. It's almost daily. You know, I have a long commute home and so if I'm not on the phone with Franchise v's or employees or partners in the business, I take the time, if I'm in a lift or if I'm on Marda or if I'm stuck in traffic or on a plane or in a taxi, that I will think, what's one thing I would do...

...differently if today were my first day. How would I? So I do it much more frequently now because it's just become how I think. But at first it was quarterly because it was a very big exercise, and then I realized because I was only focusing on one thing I needed to take immediate action on, I could do it more frequently, and so it became a monthly exercise where monthly I would carve out fifteen minutes on my calendar. Again, because of my travel and my commuting, it was always when I was traveling, so on a plane, waiting to take off, in a cab. It wasn't taking away time from my family or my employees in the office. I had other another place where I could carve the time and actually be very present and focus and not distracted. And so it became monthly. So that was my cadence and I did it for my professional job. But then I realized every time I was doing this exercise monthly, of what's one thing the new me, if I were knew at this job, would do differently than I started doing it personally and thinking of it as what if someone took over my seat? As the daughter that I am to my mother, what's one thing they would do differently or better and that I could do to be a better daughter. And when I met my husband, we started this process that we call our monthly check in on our month a versary, where we asked each other a series of between eight and ten questions every month on the day that we met at the ten what could we do better to be a better partner for each other? What could we do differently to be better for each other? What's been the best and worst part of the last three days? What's one thing I should stop with, one thing I should start? What's one thing I should continue? What's your biggest worry? What has been your greatest point of gratitude? So it's a real moment of reflection and it's a ritual for us, it's a tradition. So there's something powerful about pausing to reflect regularly personally and professionally, but also then to take the time to check in. And layered on top of the Self coaching that is this exercise, the hot shot rule, there's also this power in checking in with another human your one of your employees, your boss, one of your peers, a customer and, in the case of my personal life, my husband. You know, how are we doing and what can we work on? And it creates a safe space where it's expected to reflect and share your point of view. And because it's a safe space dedicated to that, whether it's with your employee professionally or a team member or customer, or at home personally with your partner, there's something so powerful in what comes out of it. Doesn't mean you don't address things real time as they come up in business or in your personal life, but how is it beautiful to have a ritual where you're talking about how to be better and why would we work on these things professionally more than we do at home? And it's a way, this practice has evolved for me of not being just how do I become a better business person, but how do I become a better mom and a better partner and a better daughter and a better member of my community? Hmm, absolutely, first I only imagine the impact those sorts of check ins would have, both personally and professionally. I can see so strongly the value of that. Do you suggest...

...leaders do that, ever, in a group studying, like with a whole team? Where is that not the what best way to do it? Well, I think first I think it's a very personal exercise. So you do it yourself because you need to be grounded in what is that thing you would do differently, and then you need to take immediate action and then you go to your team. So what I don't recommend is going to your team and tell them this is what I think and making promises of what you're going to do about it. The power is just as much in taking immediate action as it is in the reflection and the acknowledgement and the intention. And so I do go to my team. I go to my team in a group and say, you know, I was thinking about this and realize that if it were my first day here, I would see it very differently. And so what I did was and here is the outcome. So not only am I telling them, well, I'm vulnerable, I wasn't doing this as aggressively or assertively or whatever as one of you would do if it were your first day on the job, and so I changed. I picked up the phone or I got on the flight or I fired the person or I hired the person or I asked the question, or whatever the action is, and here was the outcome. And so the power is in the you so quickly move from the humility of asking the question to the courage of taking the action, and that's the power. It's like humility, curage, her humility, courage, humility curede. You know, you're like moving through this cycle of curiosity and humility to courage and confidence, the humility and curiosity, courage and confidence. And it's so fast because it's one thing and you take the action and then you tell the team that you almost don't have time to get stuck in the mode of well, wow, you clearly weren't bringing your best self because by definition, if you could improve, you weren't your best. We're never our best, we're always on a journey, and so if that becomes the mentality, you start to get this concept that's more like professional athletes, where the finest of athletes have coaches and they keep getting new coaches and they keep working on foundational skills because they need to do that to continue to be the best. They don't say, well, I was once the best, therefore I don't need coaches, you know. Therefore, I don't need to watch videotape of myself. Therefore, I don't need someone looking at my skills differently. No, it's their abilities, are their living and so they they pay people to watch them and tell them how to do things differently, and we have the ability to do that around us, just with reflection and a little bit of humility and courage. Yeah, it's like it doesn't leave. It doesn't leave time for you to get bogged down in comparison or what could have been, or to move back or slow down in any way. Yes, sort of like moving on, you know, wearing out of moving up, exactly and perfect. Yeah, I just can imagine to impact this specific concept can have on organizations that are feeling stuck in the mud a little bit and needing that burst of energy. So, for our last few minutes together, I just want to change gears a little bit, because one of the things that...

I admire most about you is the way you have this ability to implement the things you've learned in your career and then also turn them around to teach other people those things. I know you've mentioned that public speaking has become a real passion for you, and we are all the great gracious recipients of that. I'm just going to ask you like three quick fire questions to get some advice for leaders and you're ready, ready. What is the quality that you look for in an employee that really shows you their potential? Curiosity? HMM, okay, in what way is exactly? I'm going to clarify. You know, their ability to even if they, much like my story, don't have the right answers or don't have the experience, they have the raw potential to figure it out, and so I look for curiosity. I look for examples where they've asked and answered questions despite not being comfortable in a scenario. Yeah, all right. Next question. How can a leader improve the culture between generations in their workplace, now that we've got, for main generations working altogether, sharing personal stories, being vulnerable when people are together? Making sure you've got that diversity that's in your workplace, represented at the table, both socially and professionally, and that you open up about pieces of your life, because that really starts to share the human side of our existence and it is the connectivity between all of us when we start talking about whatever we're comfortable with, but our parents are, siblings, death, life, first law, learning. These are universal elements of the human experience and it makes it very clear what we have in common versus highlighting the things that are different between us, and that's what we need. And diverse environments is highlighting what are the experiences that actually make us quite similar, so we can build on that foundation and then draw out the benefits that come from our differences. Yeah, you know what I love most about that answer is it didn't have anything to do with technology. Feel like that's always the first answer to those questions and you're like, wells, what's different about? Yeah, learning how to snap is not gonna look at solve the world. Prop also get advice to share that very but I don't know right. Here's the last one for you. What is the first piece of advice that you give to entrepreneurs or start up founders that you feel like makes a big difference in their journey? Stay close to the customer, because your idea and product and business model is going to evolved as the customer in the marketplace changes, and what you start off doing at the beginning of the idea may not be, and in most cases isn't, what you're going to end up doing to really stand out and the customer and how they behave and how they interact with your product and what they find value and will always be your true north. Well, there you have it. That seems like golden advice there. Cat, thank you so much for joining the...

...podcast today. As always, you are a source of leadership wisdom and inspiration, so thank you. We appreciate you a lot of pleasure. Thank you, and to our audience. To learn more from Kat, you can follow and connect with her on Instagram at Cat Cole Atl. Her instagram is filled with lots of good advice and amazing adventures from all the things you've heard about, and also her sweet little baby. So he's the best. Today's episode of the leader cast podcast is brought to you by leader cast now, our digital video platform that exists to help you solve the leadership challenges you face every day, and you'll learn more about that in just a moment. But to our listeners, thank you so much for tuning in to the PODCAST. Don't forget to subscribe and share so that you don't miss a moment. Enjoy the rest of your day everyone. Leader cast now is an online resource for your leadership development. Get the solutions to your leadership challenges on any device at the moment you need it. To learn more, go to now dot leader castcom. Thanks for tuning in to the leader cast podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player.

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